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As sort of a follow-on to caitsonion's question, I was thinking… - The Desian Universe
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deskitty
deskitty
Des
Mon, Jan. 9th, 2006 08:49 pm
As sort of a follow-on to caitsonion's question, I was thinking about how being bi has changed my perception of reality over the past few years. I haven't really thought it out completely, but the following sound-bite-ish sentence covers a non-trivial chunk of it:

When over half the Western world thinks you should be killed, arrested or committed, it kinda changes your outlook on life.

Do I have a bit of a persecution complex? I guess. Every so often (like now), I can get pretty forceful/dramatic about it. But most of the people I know aren't really in any distinctive minority groups, so it's impossible for them to understand what it feels like. (I say this having been someone who didn't previously identify with any minority groups.) So one occasionally needs to resort to over-dramatization to get the point across.

Oooh, here's an interesting question. We could even turn it into a meme! (Answer the question, then repost in your own journal.)

Are you part of any minorities? If so, which ones? They could be racial, ideological (e.g. religion or political party), sexual, or whatever other kind of minority you can think of.

>>>

I think I saw an actual, honest-to-$DEITY card-carrying lesbian at the laundromat yesterday. Here I thought I was the only one in A-town whose car has an equality sticker on the back...

>>>

Gnar. I'm starting to get pissed at my neighbor for his music. I don't mind when he plays it on occasion, but it's getting to be this constant ::thump thump thump:: in the background, which is very distracting. I'm probably going to go over there in a few minutes and tell him to shut up. (Politely, of course, but still.)

Edit: Wow ... the bass coming through the floor made it sound like it was really loud, but when I went over there and knocked on his door, it was at a comfortable listening volume. So now I'm not annoyed, just wishing the apartment wasn't on stilts. ;P

-- Des

Tags: ,
Current Mood: creative creative
Current Music: Mili Sefic XTC Radio Session - Mix October 6th 2005

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phlog
phlog
Phlog
Thu, Jan. 12th, 2006 06:11 am (UTC)

When over half the Western world thinks you should be killed, arrested or committed, it kinda changes your outlook on life.

How accurate is that? I think that's a bit of an exaggeration. Especially in California.

Are you part of any minorities? If so, which ones?

Lots of the things I have any control over, I'm a minority. Atheism, vegetarianism, being in the Green Party/very liberal (though I recently changed my Facebook rating to "liberal"), OSS advocate (a minority even among software makers/users), etc.

But the distinction here is that these are all choices. Don't listen to anyone who hassles you about anything you can't change. HOWEVER, I think a big misunderstanding among gays and bisexuals is that a lot of people disagree with the CULTURE more than anything else. Unfortunately, because the vast majority of gays seem to strongly embrace the unique culture, I think people have difficulty separating the two. The same way would-be/seemingly-racists often mix up ethnicity and culture.

Honestly, I'm not a big fan of most gay culture. A lot I just think is kinda lame and/or doesn't catch my interest. Again, the distinction between culture and an unchangeable aspect is that the first ethically can (and I think, often should) be criticized, whereas the second can't be ethically criticized.


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deskitty
deskitty
Des
Thu, Jan. 12th, 2006 08:12 am (UTC)

Unfortunately, because the vast majority of gays seem to strongly embrace the unique culture, ...

I'm not sure that's true, although I certainly see how it can be perceived that way.

Plus, a lot of people don't realize there's a lot more to "gay culture" (whatever that is ... there are as many definitions as there are gay people) than sex, clubs and bars.

Honestly, I'm not a big fan of most gay culture. A lot I just think is kinda lame and/or doesn't catch my interest.

I wouldn't expect it to -- it is, after all, gay culture. ;)

Again, the distinction between culture and an unchangeable aspect is that the first ethically can (and I think, often should) be criticized, ...

Some forms of culture (or tradition) can be criticized, yes. In fact, this sounds like one facet of the argument fundies use against all forms of "homosexual behavior" (regardless of the underlying attraction).

But my standards for such criticism are high. I only consider it to be valid criticism if (a) it applies to the actions of an individual (either uniquely, or as a member of a group), and (b) the action to which it applies is socially destructive (i.e. it hurts other, non-consenting individuals).

I would consider criticisms against traditions such as circumcision (male or female, when not medically necessary), arranged marriages, or other such things, because all of those are performed without the consent of the individual(s) involved. But in my mind, behavior such as bringing home a different boy every night is not open for outside criticism. It could certainly be argued that such behavior is self-destructive and unhealthy (it's not something I would ever do, anyway), however, everyone involved is a consenting adult.

In my view, it is categorically inappropriate to criticize (or otherwise attempt to control) the behavior of consenting, informed adults unless that behavior has negative effects on other, non-consenting beings (regardless of whether or not they are capable of giving consent).

I haven't seen anything in mainstream gay culture that is worthy of such criticism.


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